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By: Dr Machione catherinfernates
Stepping out of the house in the morning can be quite refreshing when a fresh morning breeze
hits your face. Unfortunately, this fresh morning breeze can only be observed in limited places
around the planet. Extensive industrialization has resulted in poor quality of air, which has
accumulated tiny particles that could affect heart health and increase the risk for a stroke.
Recent research studies have determined that the current quality of outdoor air have exceeded
the acceptable levels that are deemed safe for heart health. The levels of pollutants in the
air were determined to be highest in urban areas, and yes—the air in rural areas are now also
polluted.

According to the latest statement of the American Health Association (AHA) published in the
journal Circulation, the accumulation of scientific and medical research efforts have discovered
the actual mechanism by which particulate matter in the air affects heart health. Very fine
particles of sizes less than 2.5 microns are present in the polluted atmosphere. The presence
of these particles has been strongly associated with an increase in the incidence of vascular
disorders, including heart attack and stroke. The general heart health of exposed individuals
are also at risk to air particles, resulting in abnormal heartbeat or arrhythmia, and other
deleterious vascular conditions such as heart failure. An alarming feature of the AHA statement
is that heart failure and stroke can occur within hours or days in an individual with poor heart
health.

The AHA heart health statement also describes smaller particulate matter (< 0.1 microns in size)
in polluted air, which is actually present in gaseous fumes such as those emitted by automobiles

during heavy traffic. These ultrafine materials can easily enter the vascular system of the
human body and induce the tightening of blood vessels. This constriction can significantly
lessen the amount of oxygen that is transported to the rest of the body, with an effect similar
to that of a stroke, which is the rupture of a blood vessel in the brain, preventing the circulation
of oxygenated blood to the entire body.

Particulate matter in polluted air has also been reported to increase the systemic blood
pressure of exposed individuals, further increasing the risk for vascular disorders and stroke.
Additional effects of air pollution include changes in the capacity for blood clotting, which is
the major feature of a stroke, and modifications in coagulant protein, thrombin. Air pollution
has also been reported to decrease the body’s capacity to elicit an immune response to foreign
particles, which occur at sites of infection or injury through the vascular system. Vascular
tissues are thus more prone to inflammation, which in turn can result in the deterioration of
heart health and more importantly, increasing the risk for stroke.

The AHA statement also emphasized the negative effect of particulate matter on the
development of atherosclerosis, or the accumulation of fatty deposits on the walls of vascular
tissues. The continuous deposition of fats can impede blood circulation, resulting in the
degeneration of heart health. Furthermore, the blockage in the vascular tissues can also induce
the occurrence of a stroke.

Air pollution can affect any individual, yet it is also important to know that there are certain
groups that are prone to the negative effects of particulate matter on heart health and stroke
risk. According to the AHA statement, young children and the elderly have a greater risk of
developing vascular diseases from exposure to polluted air. In the case of children, air pollution
can prevent further development of vascular and immune tissues, thus inhibiting these young
individuals from reaching their best heart health condition when they reach adulthood. On
the other hand, the elderly have limited capacity to fight foreign particles in their bodies,
thus increasing their chances of suffering from a stroke, developing vascular disorders, and
ultimately destroying their heart health.

Stepping out of the house in the morning can be quite refreshing when a fresh morning breeze
hits your face. Unfortunately, this fresh morning breeze can only be observed in limited places
around the planet. Extensive industrialization has resulted in poor quality of air, which has
accumulated tiny particles that could affect heart health and increase the risk for a stroke.
Recent research studies have determined that the current quality of outdoor air have exceeded
the acceptable levels that are deemed safe for heart health. The levels of pollutants in the
air were determined to be highest in urban areas, and yes—the air in rural areas are now also
polluted.
And remember, you can always get more natural health advice, the latest alternative health breakthroughs and news, plus information about nutrition, alternative remedies and cures and doctors health advice, all free when you sign up for the Bel Marra Newsletter.
Visit http://belmarrahealth.com now to find out how to start your free subscription.

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